If anyone wonders why I dislike England players in general..

English football section, also known as Ratherton's hole
ratherton
Veteran Member
Posts: 2872
Joined: 29 Oct 2005, 18:41

Post

...read this extract from the highly over-rated cry-baby, Jamie Carragher's new book.

Sitting on the England coach as it prepared to drive us away from the World Cup in Germany, I received a text message.
"F*** it! It's only England". I'd just missed a penalty in the quarter-final shoot-out against Portugal. Around me were the tear-stained faces of under-performing superstars.

England's so-called golden generation had failed. Again.
An eerie depression escorted us on the short trip back to the hotel, but as I stared at my phone and considered the implications of the comforting note, I didn't feel the same emptiness I sensed in others.

There's no such concept as 'only England' to most footballers, including many of my best friends.

Representing your country is the ultimate honour, especially in the World Cup.

Not to me. Did I care we'd gone out of the tournament? Of course I did. Passionately.

Did I feel upset about my part in the defeat? Yes. I was devastated to miss a penalty of such importance. Had I really given my all for my country? Without question.

I've never given less than 100 per cent in any game.

Despite this, whenever I returned home from disappointing England experiences one unshakeable, overriding thought pushed itself to the forefront of my mind, no matter how much the rest of the nation mourned. "At least it wasn't Liverpool," I'd repeat to myself, over and over.

The text messages of consolation I received on the coach included one from Kenny Dalglish. "I would rather miss for England than LFC," I wrote back.

I confess: defeats wearing an England shirt never hurt me in the same way as losing with my club. I wasn't uncaring or indifferent, I simply didn't put England's fortunes at the top of my priority list. Losing felt like a disappointment rather than a calamity.

The Liver Bird mauled the Three Lions in the fight for my loyalties. I'm not saying that's right or wrong, it's just how it is. You can't make yourself feel more passionate if the feelings aren't there. That doesn't make me feel guilty.

If people want to condemn me and say I'm unpatriotic, so be it.
Playing for Liverpool has been a full-time commitment. What followed with England was an extra honour, but not the be-all and end all of my purpose in the game.

We all hear about the importance of 1966 to the country, but for my family the most important event at Wembley that year was Everton winning the FA Cup. Liverpudlians feel the same way about the season as Bill Shankly won his second league title at Anfield.

Our nation is divided, not only in terms of prosperity, but by different regional outlooks. For some of us, civic pride overpowers nationality.
When Diego Maradona knocked England out of the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, 10 minutes later I was outside playing with my mates copying the handball goal.

If it had been Everton losing an FA Cup quarter-final, I wouldn't have wanted to speak to anyone for the rest of the day.

I assume this is a misprint as he is a Liverpool fan. If its correct, he is saying that he would prefer England to lose than Liverpool's arch-rivals

Wembley might have been the stadium we went to for cup finals, but it still seemed a distant, foreign place, inhabited by a different type of supporter. I discovered this to be correct when I started playing for England.

There's always a slightly sinister edge and you know the mood can shift from euphoric to vicious in the space of a few minutes.

England internationals are a magnet for fans who are a bit inexperienced, dare I say clueless, when it comes to top class football.

The Liverpool crowd has been credited with dragging us across the winning line.

I've never heard the same said of England fans at Wembley, who are more likely to help the opposition by turning on their own.

A superiority complex has also developed. It's presumed England should go close to winning every World Cup and European Championship. Failure to live up to this inevitably generates more criticism. But there's no historical justification for this and our overall record places England in the third tier of world football.

I was never in love with playing for England in the first place. By the time I stopped, I felt a huge weight lifting.

I took criticism for my decision, but when I look over my international record, I believe I was more sinned against than sinner. I never ducked out of a call-up and never pulled out with a slight twinge. For a while, I held the record for Under-21 caps.

Despite being continually seen as a deputy for others, I never complained.

Whenever Sven Goran Eriksson or Steve McClaren asked me to play, I stepped up with no fuss.

I was never sure if Eriksson was an international manager or international playboy. I know what he was best at. The longer he spent in the job, the worse his status became as a football coach and the better he became a Casanova.

Before one of his early World Cup qualifiers, a story broke about girls finding their way into the team hotel to provide some of the players with pre-match 'entertainment'.

Eriksson summoned us for what we expected to be a stern warning. Instead we received some fatherly advice.
"There's no need to have girls in the team hotel," Sven told us. "If you see someone you like, just get her phone number and arrange to go to her house after the game. Then we will have no problems."

Eriksson took the blame when we lost to Portugal in the World Cup, but for a while the investigation even focused on me. Eriksson's assistant Tord Grip highlighted my penalty miss as a chief factor in our demise.

When asked why I was one of those involved in the shootout, he explained that I took one really well in the Champions League Final.

I've watched our penalty shoot-out win in Istanbul a thousand times since 2005 and I still can't recall taking a penalty.

It's frightening to think England's assistant manager could be so ill-informed.

fawad000
Senior Member
Posts: 288
Joined: 01 Sep 2007, 18:15

Post

it's good to be honest but seriously how could someone put his club over his country?(i still don't get it);he should not have got blamed for missing the penalty as it can be missed by anyone,though i still respect him as a player but this extract has made me sad

Nat_H
Veteran Member
Posts: 1559
Joined: 11 Jun 2008, 18:03

Post

I'm not going to attempt to explain Carragher's attitude here, but for speculation, maybe he feels "closer" to his club team. I mean, the national team is made up of players you may play against with your club team, and you're not spending nearly as much time w/ your NT as opposed to your CT. IDK, you can't blame him for it, can you?

Ratherton, did you type all that out from a book? If you did, that must've taken forever!

soccer11
Admin
Posts: 4870
Joined: 24 Feb 2005, 23:40
Location: Michigan, USA

Post

It's your nation. If you don't feel proud pulling on the shirt then you should never even touch it. I'm not English so maybe this doesn't have quite the same emotional effect as you ratherton but i still think he's an idiot. I know that for players in England, pulling on the shirt and running out of the tunnel is one of the biggest honors, and he pretty much just dissed it.
i don't know what kind of reaction this is having over there but i hope that he's taking a lot of sh*t for this.

(this is also another example of why current players shouldn't write an autobiography, they might be too emotional and write some things they shouldn't)
Image

freestylejordan
Junior Member
Posts: 74
Joined: 25 Apr 2008, 07:08

Post

I think this just goes to show how much he loves Liverpool. Although you can't blame people for having a go at him as it is his country I think he has said the wrong things although there's no doubt he is a fantastic player!

soccer11
Admin
Posts: 4870
Joined: 24 Feb 2005, 23:40
Location: Michigan, USA

Post

freestylejordan wrote:I think this just goes to show how much he loves Liverpool. Although you can't blame people for having a go at him as it is his country I think he has said the wrong things although there's no doubt he is a fantastic player!
he's overrated. and also, why would you love your club more than your country? doesn't make sense. also how many brits play for liverpool? not many.
Image

Nat_H
Veteran Member
Posts: 1559
Joined: 11 Jun 2008, 18:03

Post

Maybe I missed something, but he never said he loved his club more than country, just that losing a club game was worse than an international game. Of course this has obvious implications, but I don't see as how you can question his motives...unpatriotic or not. I do understand that to an England supporter, this would be upsetting.

soccer11
Admin
Posts: 4870
Joined: 24 Feb 2005, 23:40
Location: Michigan, USA

Post

I was never in love with playing for England in the first place. By the time I stopped, I felt a huge weight lifting.
The Liver Bird mauled the Three Lions in the fight for my loyalties.
The text messages of consolation I received on the coach included one from Kenny Dalglish. "I would rather miss for England than LFC," I wrote back.
I think it's kind of clear.
Image

Nat_H
Veteran Member
Posts: 1559
Joined: 11 Jun 2008, 18:03

Post

I guess I missed something then :x

It's unfortunate that he feels that way...but the rule of national pride is unwritten...if that means anything

Hugh
Veteran Member
Posts: 2863
Joined: 20 Jan 2007, 20:26
Location: Vancouver

Post

It doesn't, if you're not going to play just as hard for england as you do for your club then you shouldn't play, it's as simple as that. I can't believe this sh*t, this is ridiculous, and I bet all the other players feel exactly the same way....

ratherton
Veteran Member
Posts: 2872
Joined: 29 Oct 2005, 18:41

Post

Hugh wrote:It doesn't, if you're not going to play just as hard for england as you do for your club then you shouldn't play, it's as simple as that. I can't believe this sh*t, this is ridiculous, and I bet all the other players feel exactly the same way....
The reason the want to play for England (or any other country) is that it means they can demand higher wages from their clubs as they are 'international' standard.

With regards his penalty miss. I was in Gelsenkirchen. He had to retake it. He'd scored the first one but hadn't waited for the refs whistle so he had to take it again.

Nat_H: That extract was printed on a newspaper website so it copied it from that.

soccer11: Most players aren't bright enough to write a book. It may well have been written by someone else based on interviews with the player.

soccer11
Admin
Posts: 4870
Joined: 24 Feb 2005, 23:40
Location: Michigan, USA

Post

ratherton wrote: soccer11: Most players aren't bright enough to write a book. It may well have been written by someone else based on interviews with the player.
well that may be true but i mean they shouldn't even put out a book about themselves (whether they wrote it or not) until they're done with their career. i don't see there being much point in buying an incomplete book, which is essentially what you're doing when you buy a book like this.
Image

Real_Zidane
Veteran Member
Posts: 1925
Joined: 11 Aug 2006, 17:36

Post

The only footballer's autobiography I don't find a joke is Keano's. The rest are unbelievably bad. Like ratherton said, most are not bright enough to write (or help write) a book.
Image

Kakasgotskillz
Veteran Member
Posts: 2159
Joined: 13 Dec 2006, 20:15

Post

Seriously, I think the only English player you should give credit to is Joe Cole. He's probably the only player with the slightest bit of creativity and that's what England needs, not some sh*t-ass overpaid sissies who are afraid to get the ball out of their own end.

flyhigh19
Veteran Member
Posts: 361
Joined: 11 Jun 2007, 02:55

Post

I think Owen is another guy who gives a lot to England when he is fit. He scores goals for England (something Rooney and Defoe can't do at the moment). He seems to be vital to the squad as if you remember last year when he came back, he had an almost immediate impact scoring those two goals against Russia. I think Owen goes all out when he plays for England. He also has been on the team since he was 18 (most of time being a regular in the squad). The only problem is that he is extremely injury prone.

Post Reply