dedication

Tell us about the league you playing in, tryouts, etc
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mak9
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Joined: 19 Sep 2005, 22:01

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hi guys

I've been here since 2004/2005 and over the years I just trained a lot and took bunch of tips from this site. Right now I'm playing at semi-pro level and have lots of contacts/coaches. Including a coach who played at the national level as a player (call him coach X). In fact I now know what one has to do make it to the national level, but it is really a question of what you want to do with your career. Do you want to play football and lose out on other opportunities?

Here's the deal......... to make it to pro you can definitely make it in your 20s. In fact I heard people in their 28s making it. But you have to train a lot...... a lot!

When coach X was training us, he was hyper-active. You can definitely tell he played at the highest level, he was super-aggressive and violent at times! He wanted perfection, any bad pass with not enough weight on it is considered a failure and he would make you run more or do a bunch of pushups. He'd come and kick/punch you if you don't perform correctly in practice.

On average in every practice he made us ran 15 kms. Even before games he'll make us do suicide runs (I am not kidding). Most of the players would work 8 hours a day just didn't had the body to put up with his physically demanding training. Many players just couldn't take it anymore. Our games were 1-1 or 1-0 because we we're so exhausted, but it really shows how much dedication it takes to become pro and national level player.

The bottom line is dedication and that you really have to run. If your in your 20s, it is better to first improve your fitness and speed rather than focus on technical skills. In fact if you can exhaust yourself to your limit, then work on your technical skill it would be better. Practice suicide runs until you can rip the grass off the field. This will be the requirements of going pro in north america.

To make it in Europe, at such a age you have to literally live a life of celibacy (I kid you not). Basically you have to focus 24 hours of your life on football, watch a lot and understand every pattern. Then you'll need to work with the coach. You have to work 3 times harder than everyone else because your experience from north America wont cut it.

Finally I say work on your manners, behave politely and professionally. One thing I noticed about my team is that we started with a bunch of guys some who were behaving professionally and some who acting like a bunch of low lifes with poor manners and constantly swearing. Coach X would kick out the latter people, because they are often the first to complain and question the coach's drills.

In addition, if you do want to go pro you have to ask yourself do you want to go all the way? What are you going to do after your career is over? The economy today is in a terrible situation with high inflation; that is all that money your going to make won't be enough 20-30 years later when your going to use it to buy food. Contrary to popular belief, pro players in Europe don't live a life of glamor driving fancy cars living in big houses. Its players in UK living like that and many of them today are finding they did a mistake of not investing all that money. Eto'o for example used to rent a small apartment near camp nou and his apartment was filled with videos of his matches and soccer magazines. He invests his money wisely and I think he started a company with his brothers.

Kasaki
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Great article, this coach X seemed very strict, how do european coaches differ from american?

klc123
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I'd say the calibre of the coachs in europe is much better. I have no experience to go by because ive never met a north american coach but europe is where the best football in the world is and its also the most difficult, but most rewarding place to try and play it.

In my opinion, you need to be giving 110% all the time if you wanna make it pro, reguardless of where you live or play.

MSILancer7
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klc123 wrote:I'd say the calibre of the coachs in europe is much better. I have no experience to go by because ive never met a north american coach but europe is where the best football in the world is and its also the most difficult, but most rewarding place to try and play it.

In my opinion, you need to be giving 110% all the time if you wanna make it pro, reguardless of where you live or play.
Yea plus in north america you see many European coaches at the higher levels but in Europe you rarely ever see a north american coach.

Nat_H
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MSILancer7 wrote:
klc123 wrote:I'd say the calibre of the coachs in europe is much better. I have no experience to go by because ive never met a north american coach but europe is where the best football in the world is and its also the most difficult, but most rewarding place to try and play it.

In my opinion, you need to be giving 110% all the time if you wanna make it pro, reguardless of where you live or play.
Yea plus in north america you see many European coaches at the higher levels but in Europe you rarely ever see a north american coach.
But where you're from means very little about how good you are. Especially when it comes to something as intangible as coaching ability. I know your observation is really just a result of culture and opportunities in Europe as opposed to N. America. Nobody can prove anything about a coach by looking at his nationality without considering his experience and results. And again, I understand as a general rule, European coaches have better experience and results--in general.

That being said, thanks for the insight, mak9.

mustahfa14
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Joined: 05 May 2007, 02:53

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mak9 wrote: When coach X was training us, he was hyper-active. You can definitely tell he played at the highest level, he was super-aggressive and violent at times! He wanted perfection, any bad pass with not enough weight on it is considered a failure and he would make you run more or do a bunch of pushups. He'd come and kick/punch you if you don't perform correctly in practice.

On average in every practice he made us ran 15 kms. Even before games he'll make us do suicide runs (I am not kidding). Most of the players would work 8 hours a day just didn't had the body to put up with his physically demanding training. Many players just couldn't take it anymore. Our games were 1-1 or 1-0 because we we're so exhausted, but it really shows how much dedication it takes to become pro and national level player.
Ok I agree with everything you say, but the coach and what he makes you do is not good. Not good at all. He would make you run suicides before the game? That is just stupid. Working 8 hours a day? INsane. That is just physically stupid. THat is not the right thing to do. I have dealt with professional coaches (not from europe) and we never did anything like this. If you ever see training for professional teams taht are actually good...you never see them do this. On game day you are supposed to rest and eat well and make sure your body is not tired, sore, or weak.

Who ever your coach is..he is insane. Running 15kms every practice? wheres the break. YOur body needs rest. That is not bad though during offseason/preseason. But in season you should never run that much every practice. My coach would call us mother fu**ers if we take a bad touch and lose it. He would yell at as saying "stop fixing the game!" if we missed passes consecutively or gave it to the other team. He was demanding technically. BUt punching you if you dont perform correctly in practice? you cant always have a perfect practice. That is where you can make mistakes...even though you should try your hardest not too.

Obviously you can tell it was not good because you guys kept tied and barely winning. Plus you were exhausted. That is some of the worst things I have heard for a coach to do physically.

mak9
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Joined: 19 Sep 2005, 22:01

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mustahfa14 wrote: Ok I agree with everything you say, but the coach and what he makes you do is not good. Not good at all. He would make you run suicides before the game? That is just stupid. Working 8 hours a day? INsane. That is just physically stupid. THat is not the right thing to do. I have dealt with professional coaches (not from europe) and we never did anything like this. If you ever see training for professional teams taht are actually good...you never see them do this. On game day you are supposed to rest and eat well and make sure your body is not tired, sore, or weak.

Who ever your coach is..he is insane. Running 15kms every practice? wheres the break. YOur body needs rest. That is not bad though during offseason/preseason. But in season you should never run that much every practice. My coach would call us mother fu**ers if we take a bad touch and lose it. He would yell at as saying "stop fixing the game!" if we missed passes consecutively or gave it to the other team. He was demanding technically. BUt punching you if you dont perform correctly in practice? you cant always have a perfect practice. That is where you can make mistakes...even though you should try your hardest not too.

Obviously you can tell it was not good because you guys kept tied and barely winning. Plus you were exhausted. That is some of the worst things I have heard for a coach to do physically.
Hey Mustahfa

It was indeed insane......thats why the manager fired him. His level was way too high........those times when I was running I felt I was being trained to fight in a nuclear war.

But to tell you the truth, his violent ways does work. There are many kids these days growing up with parents who won't hit them at home or in the streets. IMO, hitting your kids will help create discipline in them and perfect their attitude.

Similarly, if you were beaten up for every bad pass you make, chances are you will be extra focused on not making a bad pass. To be professional you have to be perfect, its a big business and you have to be trained hard enough so you can participate.

Also coaches do indeed make a big difference. A good coach is one who is very passionate and actually discusses recent professional games and will push you over your limit. Coach X for example would discuss with us about 5 plays he noticed in the Brazil vs US match. Most of the youth coaches I had didn't care about non-World Cup matches.

ScottyBoy
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Just on a side note, hitting little kids makes you look and feel like a big tough guy :twisted:
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People who say something cannot be done are often surprised by others doing it.

2brown347
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ScottyBoy wrote:Just on a side note, hitting little kids makes you look and feel like a big tough guy :twisted:
I agree with ScottyBoy, when I feel bad about myself I just go down to the local pre-school and start kicking some ass. Always makes me feel better

ScottyBoy
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2brown347 wrote:
ScottyBoy wrote:Just on a side note, hitting little kids makes you look and feel like a big tough guy :twisted:
I agree with ScottyBoy, when I feel bad about myself I just go down to the local pre-school and start kicking some ass. Always makes me feel better
Except for when you lose :?
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People who say something cannot be done are often surprised by others doing it.

2brown347
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ScottyBoy wrote:
2brown347 wrote:
ScottyBoy wrote:Just on a side note, hitting little kids makes you look and feel like a big tough guy :twisted:
I agree with ScottyBoy, when I feel bad about myself I just go down to the local pre-school and start kicking some ass. Always makes me feel better
Except for when you lose :?
I don't talk about those times :(

Croatianblood1
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2brown347 wrote:
ScottyBoy wrote:
2brown347 wrote: I agree with ScottyBoy, when I feel bad about myself I just go down to the local pre-school and start kicking some ass. Always makes me feel better
Except for when you lose :?
I don't talk about those times :(
I would do that but I am not allowed within 15 feet of a school....or a Chuckie Cheese
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