qualifying to play for a certain country

Talk about current events, entertainment, technology or anything not related to soccer
Post Reply
collin
Veteran Member
Posts: 894
Joined: 11 May 2010, 03:45

qualifying to play for a certain country

Post by collin » 03 Aug 2011, 19:52

just a quick question here, is there a certain percent of nationality you need to be to qualify to play for another nation? i know you can be a citizen, but what if you are not from the same country. Let me give you a quick example.

My grandpas dad came to USA from poland. He married a girl that was also from poland, or they moved here together or something. Thus, making my grandpa a first generation american, but he is still 100% polish. My grandpa, also married an 100% polish girl. Together they had a child (my dad) who is also 100% polish. Now, my dad married my mom who is not polish at all. Making me half polish. In any way could i qualify for playing for poland?

arsenalfc08
Veteran Member
Posts: 2115
Joined: 03 Jul 2007, 20:34

Re: qualifying to play for a certain country

Post by arsenalfc08 » 03 Aug 2011, 22:05

collin wrote:just a quick question here, is there a certain percent of nationality you need to be to qualify to play for another nation? i know you can be a citizen, but what if you are not from the same country. Let me give you a quick example.

My grandpas dad came to USA from poland. He married a girl that was also from poland, or they moved here together or something. Thus, making my grandpa a first generation american, but he is still 100% polish. My grandpa, also married an 100% polish girl. Together they had a child (my dad) who is also 100% polish. Now, my dad married my mom who is not polish at all. Making me half polish. In any way could i qualify for playing for poland?
Just to clarify your Grandfather (your dad's dad) is Polish and your father is Polish correct? If so then yes you would be eligible for a Polish passport and citizenship because your grandparents and your dad are Polish. According to wikipedia if one of the parents are Polish then the child is usually considered Polish upon birth regardless if they were born in Poland or another country. Unless your parents renounced your Polish citizenship at a Polish embassay and/or consulate within 3 months of your birth you are considered a Polish citizen because you were born to a Polish parent.

Speak with your dad about it you should be able to go to or call the nearest Polish embassay and/or consulate and get more information on how to apply for a passport. You will usually need some type of proof such as birth certificates, marriage licenses, to prove your claim to Polish citizenship.

If you get Polish citizenship then you are free to work in Poland or anywhere in the European Union as Poland is part of the EU and play for Poland's national team.

collin
Veteran Member
Posts: 894
Joined: 11 May 2010, 03:45

Post by collin » 04 Aug 2011, 01:48

awesome man, do you need a work permit to trial for clubs? I think i really like the idea of trialing to clubs in poland, firstly because its my homeland, and secondly i know the polish league isn't very strong, and its probably not even top 15 im sure in europe. So i think it would be good to start their knowing its not crazy competitive, like it would be if you were trialing for a club in the EPL or something.

arsenalfc08
Veteran Member
Posts: 2115
Joined: 03 Jul 2007, 20:34

Post by arsenalfc08 » 04 Aug 2011, 12:27

collin wrote:awesome man, do you need a work permit to trial for clubs? I think i really like the idea of trialing to clubs in poland, firstly because its my homeland, and secondly i know the polish league isn't very strong, and its probably not even top 15 im sure in europe. So i think it would be good to start their knowing its not crazy competitive, like it would be if you were trialing for a club in the EPL or something.
No you don't need a work permit to trial with any club in any country. You will need one to sign with clubs in certain countries like the UK (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland).

scottS4
Veteran Member
Posts: 851
Joined: 30 Jan 2009, 23:49

Post by scottS4 » 06 Aug 2011, 05:57

collin wrote:awesome man, do you need a work permit to trial for clubs? I think i really like the idea of trialing to clubs in poland, firstly because its my homeland, and secondly i know the polish league isn't very strong, and its probably not even top 15 im sure in europe. So i think it would be good to start their knowing its not crazy competitive, like it would be if you were trialing for a club in the EPL or something.
You'd be surprised. I'm sure the level of professional club academies in Poland is much higher than you'd think. Soccer is the most popular sport in Poland, which means most kids play it, and only the best kids get into the academies. I'm not saying its impossible for you, but don't expect it to be uncompetitive.

collin
Veteran Member
Posts: 894
Joined: 11 May 2010, 03:45

Post by collin » 06 Aug 2011, 12:50

oh for sure man i know its there most popular sport, to be honest i don't even think i could make one of their better academys, who knows. Im sure there all competitive, like everywhere else around the world. But it would be a better feeling knowing im going into trials with a polish academy rather than barcelona, madrid, chelsea, man u, tottenham ect.....

Sometimes i wonder where all the talent is in poland. I really do not understand it, its right in the middle of everything how can they not have great players? and its a fairly big country. But yet they still fail to qualify for anything. Atleast they lucked out on the Euro 2012 this time

Had2bHarry
Veteran Member
Posts: 935
Joined: 16 Dec 2007, 06:45

Post by Had2bHarry » 10 Aug 2011, 03:55

I should point out that FIFA introduced a new rule recently about being able to play for different countries. You cant represent a country if you have been granted citizenship just to play football for them. Like Kofi Danning for example. He migrated to Australia with his family from Africa when he was two, but FIFA had to make sure that that wasn't all part of FFA's plan to get him to play for the socceroos :roll: . I might be a little off, someone might correct me, but Im pretty sure that's the new ruling
Image
Sig by me

Rome_Leader
The Italian Mod
Posts: 3028
Joined: 19 Jun 2007, 22:03

Post by Rome_Leader » 10 Aug 2011, 12:10

How can they determine such a thing? :p Seems subjective at best. If collin says he doesn't just want to play football, isn't that enough? Or will he also need to be educated or work there, or something?
Image

All roads lead to Rome.

Triskaidekaphobia: The unnatural fear of the number 13.
Most of Ballack's opposition have this phobia.

I'm Scott. Don't let the title fool you; I.AM.CANADIAN!

ScottyBoy
Veteran Member
Posts: 1692
Joined: 05 Aug 2007, 15:39

Post by ScottyBoy » 10 Aug 2011, 12:57

I think it is a lot easier to go professional in the USA than a country such as Poland. I would say it would be a much better use of your time to get into a good team in the USA.
Image

People who say something cannot be done are often surprised by others doing it.

arsenalfc08
Veteran Member
Posts: 2115
Joined: 03 Jul 2007, 20:34

Post by arsenalfc08 » 10 Aug 2011, 13:16

I know FIFA has rules on switching national teams. Lets say George Striker is eligible for the USA and Norway and plays in the U-17 World Cup as a substitute for the USA. Despite being an U-17 event the U-17 World Cup is still an official tournament according to FIFA and now George is cap-tied to the USA since he played in the tournament.

Let's remember George is also eligible for Norway and had a Norwegian passport/citizenship at the time he played for the USA in the U-17 World Cup. A couple years late George seems to have fallen off the radar of the USA program and recieves a call up from Norway for an U-21 European Championship qualifier. George is able to make a one time switch to be eligible for Norway, once the proper paperwork is filed by FIFA there is no going back. The key for the switch is that the player must be eligible for country B (citizenship) at the time they represented country A

panchester07
Veteran Member
Posts: 3849
Joined: 27 Aug 2007, 04:25

Post by panchester07 » 10 Aug 2011, 18:05

Hmmm.... It doesn't sound to bad of a plan.. To be honest, Poland doesn't have bad players, look around top leagues and clubs in Europe and there are quite a few polish players out there playing important roles and what not.. I think i agree with scottyboy though.. The american system isn't "the best" to compete against top football nations, but it does offer a lot of opportunities is pretty organized, and its achievable for you..

Playing 4 years of high school, going to tournaments, playing club, getting seen by scouts, then assisting to college camps or doing whatever you need to do to get on a good college team sounds like a pretty realistic, and cool plan... If you're really serious about football you can excell and be the best in your team/league and grow.. Plus you could play USL or PDA and take things one step at at time, next thing you know you might end up in the mls which isn't Real Madrid or Barcelona but its pretty fu**ing good and better than opportunity than many people have.. Just saying for looking at europe, you might be overlooking the good things you have in your country..

Then again, make some research, talk to coaches, email coaches, email academy's, find out about trials in poland or europe.. you don't loose anything but america doesn't seem like a bad plan b..

just my humble opinion
to know Him is to want to know Him more"


"i don't know where the limit is, but I know where it is not"

Tocar y moverse y tratarla siempre muy muy bien..'

collin
Veteran Member
Posts: 894
Joined: 11 May 2010, 03:45

Post by collin » 10 Aug 2011, 19:57

ye man your right i would also like to play PDL or USL pro while im in college, atleast i know you can play PDL in college but no usl

Post Reply