what to do in warming-up

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owensglory
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Joined: 21 Feb 2006, 15:26

what to do in warming-up

Post by owensglory » 04 Mar 2006, 18:29

what we need to do when warming-up?
i am practising upper body muscle now,and dont exercise my legs' muscles.can i warm up by jogging?
jogging just use leg,if not jogging,what warm up exercises should i do?
if i want to lift up a dumbell 10 kg,can i warm up by using lighter dumbell first,like 2-6...kg?
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B Heck
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Post by B Heck » 05 Mar 2006, 20:33

A jog and then a lighter weight is a good way to do it.

For a proper warm-up, the first thing to do is get your muscles warm and get your blood pumping. The easiest way to do that is with the bigger muscles of the leg with a light jog or a stationary cycle in the gym. Then you have to prepare the muscles you will be using for more strenuous actions. There is a mental component to this as well. For weightlifting, I always start with an unloaded bar or extremely light weight. Slowly move the weight through the complete range of motion with absolutely perfect technique for about 5 reps. If everything feels right, then try speeding up the movement for another 5-10 reps. Then try a weight a little closer to your working weight and just do maybe 8 reps as fast smooth and perfectly as possible. For weights under 110 lbs / 50 kg, 1-2 warmups are sufficient. For heavier things under 300, increase 44 lbs / 20 kg per set and just do 3-5 reps per set. Over 300, increase 90 lbs, 40 kg per set. It is very important that you rehearse the movement you will be doing with a lighter weight. People who don't warm up like this usually have a shaky slow first work set and a much better 2nd set since their first set is wasted as a warmup.

For bench press it is also good to warm up the rotator cuffs with hanging circles, external roatations, internal rotations. Ask me about these if you can train with over 220 lbs / 100 kg.

soccerjunkie
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Post by soccerjunkie » 28 Apr 2006, 15:22

to warm up for lifting, do some light jogging or cardio, and then stretch (especially the muscles you want to work). stretching increases bloodflow and warms up the muscle for activity, if you dont stretch that muscle, you could injure yourself

B Heck
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Posts: 159
Joined: 21 Apr 2005, 16:40
Location: Washington state

Post by B Heck » 28 Apr 2006, 16:59

soccerjunkie wrote:to warm up for lifting, do some light jogging or cardio, and then stretch (especially the muscles you want to work). stretching increases bloodflow and warms up the muscle for activity, if you dont stretch that muscle, you could injure yourself
You might want to rethink some of the conventional wisdom about stretching. As a former competitive lifter, I can tell you that flexibility beyond the range of motion of the lift is useless and even counterproductive.

Here's some interesting reading:

An article titled: The role of flexibility in injury prevention and athletic performance: have we stretched the truth?:

"The use of stretching to prevent injury, off-set muscle soreness, and improve performance has been widely accepted and promoted in sports. However, little or no scientific evidence supports the practice, and recent research suggests that stretching, which increases flexibility beyond that needed for sport-specific movements, may cause injury. This article presents studies that have looked at the effects of stretching on injury and performance. Many earlier studies that showed benefits of stretching did not look at the effects of stretching alone; they also involved general cardiovascular workouts in the experimental but not control groups. More recent research shows that general fitness, rather than stretching, is a more important risk factor in injury prevention. This article also discusses studies of the relationship between joint laxity and injury and the role that stiffness may play in enhancing performance and preventing injury. Overall, the evidence suggests that increasing range of motion beyond function through stretching is not beneficial and can actually cause injury and decrease performance. These findings should be used to challenge common warm-up practices in athletics."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum


Static stretches prior to lifting decrease force output:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... &DB=pubmed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_DocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum

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