Cardio and Working out

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romania_soccer
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Cardio and Working out

Post by romania_soccer » 26 Oct 2005, 22:13

Ok here's the problem: I work out 4 times a week and the sessions last around 1 hour. However, I recently noticed that I got out of breath a lot more often than I did before. I think this is due to a lack of enough aerobic activity in the past months. So my question is: Is it possible to integrate enough cardio workouts (2-3??) in my plan and not risk overtraining?
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B Heck
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Re: Cardio and Working out

Post by B Heck » 27 Oct 2005, 17:15

romania_soccer wrote:Ok here's the problem: I work out 4 times a week and the sessions last around 1 hour. However, I recently noticed that I got out of breath a lot more often than I did before. I think this is due to a lack of enough aerobic activity in the past months. So my question is: Is it possible to integrate enough cardio workouts (2-3??) in my plan and not risk overtraining?
Yes. Low intensity cardio is a good thing to do in the days between high intensity weightlifting, plyometric, sprint, or games speed activities. It can even help recovery if you focus on getting your heart rate up but not pushing muscles into aneorobic failure. By low intensity, I mean that you are not making muscles perform high force contractions, just repetitive aerobic activity that makes you breath really hard.

Louie Simmons, a very original thinker in training strength, coaches powerlifters to get out of the gym and do cardio exercises that he classifies as General Physical Preparedness (GPP) on their nonlifting days. He feels that this GPP work increases an athletes ability to train hard.

An old Louie Simmons article on GPP: http://www.deepsquatter.com/strength/archives/ls14.htm

However, I would not go for a long jog over hilly terrain the day before a heavy squat workout or the morning of. The day after is good for that.

romania_soccer
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Post by romania_soccer » 27 Oct 2005, 21:49

Thanks a lot for the answer Bob, informative as always!:)
I thought about swimming for 30 minutes 2 times a week, is it working muscles too hard or should I stick with running or a stationary bike?
And for the frequency, 30 minutes twice a week is fine or do I need more? I don't want to put full emphasis on cardio, but I'm aiming for decent enough results. And just a last thing, 70 to 80% of my maximum hear rate is fine?
Thanks again.
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B Heck
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Post by B Heck » 28 Oct 2005, 00:56

romania_soccer wrote: I thought about swimming for 30 minutes 2 times a week, is it working muscles too hard or should I stick with running or a stationary bike?
And for the frequency, 30 minutes twice a week is fine or do I need more? I don't want to put full emphasis on cardio, but I'm aiming for decent enough results. And just a last thing, 70 to 80% of my maximum hear rate is fine?
Thanks again.
You aren't close to the volume of training needed to overtrain, especially for a teenager. Plus you are doing different things from one day to the next, so no one area is getting hammered. When you are training morning and evening, feel like you are going backwards, lose your appetite, and can't sleep, then you have a problem.

If your goal is to increase aerobic capacity, not just burn fat, I think you should work at a higher heart rate. Most competitive athletes train at their lactate threshold (84-90% of their MHR).

Running would be the most sport specific thing to do although swimming would be a nice change of pace. Swimming would be good if you need to have well rested legs the next day. Running would be better before upper body workouts.

30 minutes, twice a week...maybe. I don't know much about how little one can do and still see results. You will have to try and see in some quantitative way. Monitor your resting heartrate in the morning and see if it decreases as you build aerobic capacity. Lifecycles with heart monitors are also a good way to measure improvements in your cardio fitness. Or run for a fixed amount of time and measure the distance (laps around a soccer field or track).

romania_soccer
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Post by romania_soccer » 28 Oct 2005, 02:40

Browsed a bit on google and found out this:
"Frequency refers to how often one exercises. It is related to the intensity and duration of the exercise session. Conditioning the cardio respiratory system can best be accomplished by three adequately intense workouts per week."

I guess two cardio sessions per week isn't that bad then. I just have to make them intense enough. I'll alternate swimming and running bi-weekly.
Thanks for the help!
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*~El Maestro~*
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Post by *~El Maestro~* » 30 Oct 2005, 21:00

what my P.E teacher made us do was go very fast for 10 minutes.(and count the number of laps) and then rest for five minutes. then go for another 10 minutes and rest again.

Or
do a 100 meters full speed and rest for one minute, and repeat like 5 or 6 times.
he says it's like in a real game because you sprint then recover then sprint again then recover.

This was for swimming. I'm probably younger than you though so you may want to switch around the number of minutes.

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