Obliques (External & Internal Oblique)
Trunk rotation

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Back (Latissimus Dorsi & Teres Major)

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Trunk-sided bend

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Buttock (Gluteus Maximus, Medius & Minimus)
The muscles on your buttocks (glutes) work along with your hamstrings and quads to draw your leg backward and to extend it forward. Your glutes also affect a wide range of hip motion including rotation, adduction and more. If you have weak glutes, you’ll have difficulty controlling your hip and thigh movement. Your body will compensate by using other muscles, but your movements will be weaker and you’ll be at higher risk for injury.
Buttock / lower back stretch

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Quadriceps (Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Intermedius & Medialis)

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Hip flexor/rotator (Iliopsoas & Sartorius)
Iliopsoas or hip flexor is a group of muscles connecting the pelvis and lower spine to your hip bone. The Iliopsoas flexes the hip forward, in conjunction with other muscles from the inner and front thigh. Therefore, the hip flexor is crucial in virtually all kicking techniques and spraining it will cause sharp groin pain, whenever you try to lift your leg up. The hip flexor also acts to move the top of the pelvis forward and not stretching it may sometimes cause lower back pain.
Hip flexor stretches

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Groin (Gracilis, Adductor Brevis, Longus & Magnus)
Groin stretches

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Hamstring (Biceps Femoris, Semitendinosus, Semimembranosus)
The hamstring is a group of muscles on the back of your thigh. It is responsible for bending or flexing your knee, while the quadriceps straightens it. Hamstrings and glut muscles are crucial for explosive acceleration. Having strong and flexible hams results in a longer running stride and also lessens the effects of fatigue that affect your form over time. The hamstring is the most frequently strained muscle in soccer.
Hamstring stretches

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Calves (Gastrocnemius)
Calves are the muscles on the posterior of your lower leg. Your calves are responsible for “stabilizing” your ankles every time you touch the ground. They also play a significant role in rapid change of direction and deceleration. If your calves are weak you may experience ankle problems or extra strain on your quads.